Q & A

Q: If I'm racing, is a new boat faster than a old one?
A: Certainly if the old boat is broken down. Old boats are never a bargain, but they can get people into our sport on the cheap. Some old boats can even have legs. New boats require zero additional investment, are guaranteed to be fast and come with a 5 year limited warranty. Not to mention new sails and a trailer.

A: If you like having nice things, and can afford it, then you will want a new boat.

Q: Can the Scot be capsized?
A: Yes, but not easily. Furthermore, if the centerboard is down then she just wants to lay on her side. We have a 90 pound girl at sail camp that can right the boat.

Q: Where should my rake and tension be set at.
A: Your new boat will come with these adjustments set.
A: If you're racing, then it depends on the sails you use and also you're sailing style. We tune Norths to 28'5" on the rake and 110 pounds on the forestay. We tune Mads to 28'5.75" on the rake and 110-120 pounds on the forestay. You can find more info on tuning on our <a href="https://flyingscot.com/how-to/">how to page</a>.

Q: I'm not sure how to rig a FS.
A: All boats bought from the factory come with a 6 hour demonstration where we'll show you how we rig, launch and sail the FS.
A: We also offer lessons, basic rigging manuals, and online tutorials.

Q: What should I look for when buying a used boat.
A: Make sure that the jib tracks are still tight, the mast and boom are not bent, and tap every square inch of the boat where there's wood core. If it sounds hollow, don't buy that boat. Of course check all blocks, fittings, sails, attachments and accessories for there condition.
A: If you're going to be racing we also suggest that you weigh the boat before purchasing it, and check to see if the shim in the centerboard is still good.

Q: What kind of repairs can be done on a Flying Scot
A: With many boats older than 30 years old out there, we've seen all kinds of repairs necessary on old boats. We can fix anything, but some boats will not be worth the investment.

Q: Does my board need shimmed?
A: All boats from the factory come with shims, but it's not always been that way. We did not use to shim daysailing boats. That being said most boats seem to have a shim, whether it be original or added in. It's tough to say what kind of difference a shim makes in the performance of the boat. In light choppy conditions you'll want a shim, but it might be otherwise negligible.
A: Note that the shim must allow the board to go up and down. So, there will always be some movement at the bottom of the board.

Spinnaker Pole
Flying Scot North American's
Day Sailor on lift w/ motor